Wednesday, April 04, 2012

Putting an IGN writer in your game? What could possibly go wrong?

Oh right. This. This is what could possibly go wrong.

I'm not sure if the icing on the cake is where she reveals she hasn't finished the game in question herself, or where she just invents words like a genuine Willy Am Shakespeare ("Babsolutly")?

Actually no, calling the fanbase of a game she appears in "entitled whiners" while working for a company whose job it is to review videogames would be the icing on the cake.

Eventually the post was simply deleted instead of updated with an apology, which arrived here. Then you have this frankly amazing "I'm closing my blog / no I'm not" emofest here.

See Bioware? This is why you don't put people in games who write about games - even if they write things like "Babsolutly".

It's telling when one of the most articulate commentaries about the whole end of game fiasco on a gaming site is written by a structural biologist rather than any number of videogame wesite staffers, who (based on the previous half a zillion entries seen so far) would more likely ramble on about how gamers are entitled, how they need to shut up. how they wanted a "happy ending" or how a game is a work of art (because as we all know, nothing screams artistic integrity like a game finishing then popping a "Buy DLC" prompt immediately afterwards).

Or hey, let's go over that Moriarty drama again. Is he still throwing a hissy fit on Twitter? I have no idea, I blocked him in advance so I never have to risk seeing any of his cutting insight.

Games journalism is a sideshow. Many years ago, I sent a review of Silent Hill 1 to a major "official" publication when they advertised writer positions. I went there, had a face to face, walked around the office and the offshoot of the interview was that I was "too critical" (isn't that people are supposed to be paying me for?) and I should consider writing about movies instead.

It didn't take me long to notice a good portion of the staff there were walking around in what had to be free promotional clothing for [insert game of the month here].

THIS IS AT LEAST TEN YEARS AGO.

Can anyone tell me what major changes have taken place in games journalism since then? Because the next time random games writer guy accuses gamers of being "entitled" and being at fault for simply wondering where the "sell sell sell" promo blurbs of publishers ended up in the game: you may want to ask yourself if you paid for that cool dudebro free hoodie, the guest pass to all those VIP parties and the six free games your company let you keep.

Meanwhile, one of the best sources for critical thinking in gaming right now seems to be the Forbes Gaming section. Not only does it make a lot of sense, there's also zero risk of seeing the word "Babsolutly" which I'm pretty sure is missing an "e".

No comments: